Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson (born September 5, 1933) is an American photographer. His photographs, notably those taken in Harlem, New York City, have been widely exhibited and published. He is known for photographing communities usually hostile to outsiders.

Davidson began taking photographs when he was 10 years old and this passion has stayed with him throughout his life. When he was drafted into the army he was station in Paris where he met Henri Cartier-Bresson; one of the founding members of Magnum.

Bruce Davidson became a member of Magnum Photos in 1958. In the three years after joining Magnum, he made some of his most famous bodies of work including: “The Dwarf”, “Brooklyn Gang,” and “Freedom Rides.” Furthermore, he has received many awards and fellowships. For instance, a Guggenheim fellowship (1963), National Endowment for the Arts (1967) and Open Society Institute Individual Fellowship (1998).

Davidson most renowned body of work “Subway” was made on the New York Metro in 1980 and was first published in 1982 alongside an exhibition at the International Center for Photography.

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